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FALLING LIGHT

'Falling Light in Liminal Spaces', explores our migratory lives spent increasingly on the move. The work lives in the spaces that we pass through, spaces that move, adapt and evolve across time, just as our bodies do, creating an environment that is in constant flux. 

We move with the space and the space moves through us, as we cut across space, pierce tranquil landscapes, pile land on land, create a rhythm of building, demolishing and reassembling. We create a dialogue with the spaces that we move through, and a dialogue with the spaces that we hold, and that hold us. 

The rate of modernisation in India in the past decade suggests that in another decade the rural communities of Bangalore will have dramatically decreased. What many may see as a space to be passed through or potential land for new builds is a significant and wholesome place for many, holding memories, culture and tradition with layers of ancestral history. 

Age Guidance: No restrictions

Duration 45 minutes

 
 

  'Delightfully authentic and beautiful'

   Audience Member, Falling Light 2015

 
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ON SITE

FALLING LIGHT IN LIMINAL SPACES

The on site Falling Light research aimed to uncover the ‘disappearing communities of India’, with a specific focus on Ulsoor, Palace Gutahali and Kothanur in Bangalore. These communities have been caught in a flux between a simple and traditional way of living and the pressures of a vastly modernising society. With their way of life in perpetual threat, their community is being forced into a space that it doesn’t belong, a space of liminality, of unsurety and imbalance.

A team of Chhaya Collective artists have been exploring the trials that face communities as they battle to stay afloat amongst the ever modernising and expanding urban milieu of Bangalore City - questioning the changes that they ultimately face.

What many may see as a space to be passed through or potential land for new builds, is a significant and wholesome place for many, holding memories, culture and tradition, with layers of ancestral history. There is a simplicity, an honest and authentic approach to living, which is almost unaffected by the media, world politics, fads, frenzies and the effects of globalisation. Though unfortunately we can all predict that the same will not be said in ten years time.

We have found something very humbling about this approach to life and have enjoyed being part of the sense of stillness that the community carries with them. A place of ambient stillness amongst a whirlwind of motion and change.

Chhaya Collective 2015

 

"Art without Borders"

Bangalore Deccan Chronicle (India)

 
 

CREATIVE TEAM

 

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Kay Crook

MUSICAL DIRECTOR

Cam Crook

DANCERS

Ajeesh Balakrishnan, Kay Crook

COSTUME DESIGN

Kay Crook

DRAMATURG

Nakula Somana

PHOTOGRAPHY

Abdul Raheem

FILM

Nirup Divankaran

TRANSLATION

Nakula Somana

TRAILER

John Freddie Jones

 I wholly support Chhaya Collective's work, vision and dedication towards discovering a common ground for cultural experiences to form a new fabric of movement aesthetic.

Aakash Odedra, Aakash Odedra Dance Company

 
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